Tiamat, Queen of the Dragons!

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Buukaz Bonecrush Tortle Barbarian

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Mordenkainen the Wizard – Planeswalker

This portrait of Mordenkainen envelopes so much of what I love about my career as an artist – from portraiture, to narrative storytelling, rendering of reflective surfaces, dramatic lighting effects, and most importantly conveying a sense of wonder and mystery. We may never know what the wizard was working upon as we interrupted his contemplative thoughts in his study, but we can be certain we will feel the wrath of his ire!
Ever since discovering Dungeons and Dragons in my youth, I have enjoyed the complexities, challenges, and excitement of role-playing the character class of wizards. This portrait represents the deep passion I have for gaming and the art creation infused within my youth around roleplaying. It was this wellspring I returned to again and again as this work evolved.
Reaching back deep into those wizardry gaming roots are a set of bookends I created during my hard-core D&D days, with one side a diorama composed with the elements from Grenadier’s ‘Wizard’s Room’ lead figurine miniature set. I loved to paint these miniatures, owning handfuls of the diverse sets produced, and enjoyed endless hours of enjoyment in use in our campaigns.
Due to the lack of access to proper art supplies as a young artist, all small details on these figurines were rendered and applied with sharpened toothpicks. I am happy to state those logistical hurdles are no longer a hinderance in my art creation now! I have long ago learned that proper tools are part of the pathway to creating masterful, professional works of art.
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The Dungeon Master – D&D Cartoon original Art for Secret Lair

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Tyler Walpole grew up, literally, eating cereal in front of the TV watching this show, and from making cel-shaded fanart of Critical Role characters and then pitching the style to Wizards, art director Tom Jenkot called him up to make art that is exactly, down to pantone, in Magic’s upcoming secret lair.
You can see how Tyler had to mix the paint in one photo in the separate plastic paint color receptacles, to keep the solid flat color consistent, identical to an original animate cel creator. He applied 5-6 layers per area of color, by “pushing the glob” on the acetate to have it opaque. While he says it took the same amount of time vs. a normal Magic painting, the prep work to have colors matching exactly, the process of hand-making the lines and mixing paint, took him a better part of two months to do the six pieces.