If a huge creature fails it’s save and next round I cast fireball, will 27 cubes of web be in contact with the creature meaning the creature would take an additional 54d4 damage?

5 thoughts on “If a huge creature fails it’s save and next round I cast fireball, will 27 cubes of web be in contact with the creature meaning the creature would take an additional 54d4 damage?

  1. D. Walker says:

    “The webs are flammable. Any 5-foot cube of webs exposed to fire burns away in 1 round, dealing 2d4 fire damage to any creature that starts its turn in the fire.”

    This seems like a cut and dry case. The wording is quite clear.

    As written, EACH 5-foot cube of burning webs is inflicting 2d4 fire damage to EVERY creature inside that particular 5-foot cube of burning webs.

    If a single creature is inside 27 different cubes, it is dealt 2d4 fire damage by each and every one of those cubes.

    This is even more clear cut than the Tidal Wave + Fire Elemental combo.

    • Dabbla says:

      Any cube, not each cube. And it says it deals damage to a creature that starts it turns *in* *the* *fire*. I.e.: The rule establishes the area of the fire, not damage per unit area.

        • I guess it depends on your DM (and group’s) personal views on fire. Would a smaller fire deal less damage, theoretically? I imagine a good comparison would be standing in a bonfire versus holding your hand over a match… one would hurt, one would potentially kill you.

          Scale that up to a large creature that takes up lots of space. A small campfire (or fire that occupies a 5 ft square) versus a giant web that’s on fire. It’s not necessarily that the fire deals more damage because it’s bigger– but that it deals damage to more of the target’s surface area.

          I think, regardless of if its a “single fire” or not, standing in multiple squares of flame as a larger creature would constitute extra damage.
          (Or, possibly, taking less damage from a single square than a Medium creature would. If we keep with the surface area equivalence.)

          • Jeremy Graten says:

            The rules do not depend on independent views. There is one unambiguous meaning, and any other ruling would not be following the language as its written.
            Break the rules if you wish of course for whatever reasons you wish, but know that it is not up to perspective.

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